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Tuesday, September 6

  1. page 06 Biomes edited ... Having understood more about biomes are you able to help to conserve them? Play the Watershed…
    ...
    Having understood more about biomes are you able to help to conserve them?
    Play the Watershed Game and see how good you are.
    I LOVE JACOB Z YAY LOL HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA
    (view changes)

Friday, August 29

  1. page 06 Biomes edited ... BIOMES A biome is a major ecosystem spread over a wide geographic area, and characterised by …
    ...
    BIOMES
    A biome is a major ecosystem spread over a wide geographic area, and characterised by certain types of flora and fauna
    no butt
    {biomes_map.jpg} Biome map
    For more global maps to show the soil resources, visit the Natural Resources Conservation Service
    (view changes)

Thursday, April 24

  1. page 06 Biomes edited ... BIOMES A biome is a major ecosystem spread over a wide geographic area, and characterised by …
    ...
    BIOMES
    A biome is a major ecosystem spread over a wide geographic area, and characterised by certain types of flora and fauna
    no butt
    {biomes_map.jpg} Biome map
    For more global maps to show the soil resources, visit the Natural Resources Conservation Service
    (view changes)
  2. page 06 Biomes edited ... BIOMES A biome is a major ecosystem spread over a wide geographic area, and characterised by …
    ...
    BIOMES
    A biome is a major ecosystem spread over a wide geographic area, and characterised by certain types of flora and fauna
    no
    {biomes_map.jpg} Biome map
    For more global maps to show the soil resources, visit the Natural Resources Conservation Service
    (view changes)

Tuesday, January 28

  1. page 08 Beluga Whale edited A Case Study of Beluga Whales (Delphinapterus leucas) Beluga {Beluga_Whales.jpg} Beluga whale…

    A Case Study of Beluga Whales (Delphinapterus leucas)
    Beluga{Beluga_Whales.jpg} Beluga whales are
    Scientists have found that there has been no increase in the Beluga Whale population in the St. Lawrence River in the last 50 years. By reading various passages and answering questions based on these passages in a sequential manner, piece together the scientists’ inquiry and analyze both the process and product of the investigation to find the answer to this question.
    In order to ensure that you go through the inquiry process step-by-step please DO NOT be tempted to search for the answers online. Whatever information that is needed to deduce the answers on your own will be provided.
    ...
    In comparison, Arctic beluga in other locations did not display any of these conditions, nor did other species of whales or seals living in the St. Lawrence. Both of the latter groups contained the same toxic substances as the belugas, but in lesser amounts. Finally the scientists also found that the toxins were not confined to the fat in blubber. Small amounts were found in other tissues, which might have contributed more readily to the injury of vital organs. In answering the original questions the scientists proposed that the whales were victims of pollution.
    When the scientists presented their evidence and explanation suggesting that pollution was the cause of the low numbers and lack of increase in the beluga population, other marine biologists maintained that toxins were not at fault. The skeptical scientists argued that although the diseases and lesions observed in belugas matched the known effects of toxic chemicals, the original investigations had not demonstrated a cause-and-effect relationship.
    ...
    May 1996)
    Based on your understanding, were the original investigations adequate? Why or why not?
    Did the scientists use appropriate tools and techniques to gather, analyze, and interpret data? How do you know?
    (view changes)

Saturday, November 2

  1. page 08 Beluga Whale edited ... Concentrate on the final question, What would be the best approach to design and conduct a sci…
    ...
    Concentrate on the final question, What would be the best approach to design and conduct a scientific investigation that would demonstrate a cause-and-effect relationship? Record your responses.
    Passage Two
    ...
    Lawrence River
    A

    A
    team of
    ...
    by Pierre BélandBéland began a
    Still curious about why the population remained low, the biologists continued their investigations. During a 15-year period the team recorded 179 deaths and examined 73 carcasses. The entire sample was highly contaminated with an array of chemicals.
    Results of the study included the following.
    ...
    were cancerous.
    The

    The
    whales had
    ...
    perforated ulcers.
    45%

    45%
    of females
    ...
    mammary glands.
    Lesions

    Lesions
    of the
    ...
    were common.
    Some

    Some
    whales had
    ...
    immune systems.
    In comparison, Arctic beluga in other locations did not display any of these conditions, nor did other species of whales or seals living in the St. Lawrence. Both of the latter groups contained the same toxic substances as the belugas, but in lesser amounts. Finally the scientists also found that the toxins were not confined to the fat in blubber. Small amounts were found in other tissues, which might have contributed more readily to the injury of vital organs. In answering the original questions the scientists proposed that the whales were victims of pollution.
    When the scientists presented their evidence and explanation suggesting that pollution was the cause of the low numbers and lack of increase in the beluga population, other marine biologists maintained that toxins were not at fault. The skeptical scientists argued that although the diseases and lesions observed in belugas matched the known effects of toxic chemicals, the original investigations had not demonstrated a cause-and-effect relationship.
    ...
    Examined blood samples from contaminated whales to determine the levels of organo- halogens in the plasma and the numbers and responses of immune cells, and
    Determined the minimum levels at which the ill effects of organohalogens arise.
    ...
    like a naïvenaïve detective who
    In this statement the scientist was referring to an alternative explanation. The investigators noticed that organohalogen levels were often higher in very young animals, which contradicted another common explanation – toxins accumulate during the animals’ lifetime. Also, they found that adult females were consistently less contaminated than the males. These observations suggested the explanation that the females passed significant amount of chemicals on to their calves. When the team examined several females that had died shortly after giving birth, they found evidence for this explanation. The milk provided the evidence. The suckling calf ingests food that is far more contaminated than its mother’s food. In ecological terms, the calves feed at a higher echelon in the food chain where the toxins have been concentrated. Every new wave of calves begins life with higher levels of toxins than those of their mothers. They then take in fish that also contain higher levels of toxins each year. So, each new generation begins at a less advantageous position than prior generations.
    The scientists proposed an answer to the original question – What explains the lack of increase of the beluga population? All the evidence indicates that the belugas have failed to increase in number due to the long-term exposure to a complex mixture of toxic chemicals.
    (view changes)

Wednesday, October 9

Wednesday, July 31

Wednesday, October 10

Saturday, October 30

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